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These Stranded Seals on the Johnstone Strait are really not stranded at all. If they wanted to they could easily (well easily and clumsily) climb onto or off of these rocks and into the water. However, living in the land-locked province that I do (Alberta), it’s always fascinating to me to watch these animals move from water to land and vice-versa.

 

I like that the face/speckles of these seals really matches the covering of the rock with almost the same tones. I guess it probably helps them camouflage against their predators, which include Killer Whales (transients) and Steller Sea Lions. While they will sleep both on land and in the water, I think I have only ever seen Harbour Seals sleeping on land, or really rocks like this one. Besides sleeping, going on land allows them to warm up quicker by getting dry and having the sun heat both themselves and the rocks that they go on. But going on land is hard on these seals because since they can’t walk, they have to drag themselves and hop around, which often leads to getting scuffs and cuts.

 

This image is copyright © Terri Shaddick, if you are interested in using or purchasing this image, or any other images on my site, contact Terri Shaddick at contact@wildelements.ca.

 

Taken: August 13, 2016
Location: Johnstone Strait, British Columbia

Camera: Canon EOS 1D X
Lens: Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM + 1.4x III Extender
Focal Length: 700mm
Aperture: f/13
ISO: 800
Exposure: 1/2000

About this Image

These Stranded Seals on the Johnstone Strait are really not stranded at all. If they wanted to they could easily (well easily and clumsily) climb onto or off of these rocks and into the water. However, living in the land-locked province that I do (Alberta), it’s always fascinating to me to watch these animals move from water to land and vice-versa.

 

I like that the face/speckles of these seals really matches the covering of the rock with almost the same tones. I guess it probably helps them camouflage against their predators, which include Killer Whales (transients) and Steller Sea Lions. While they will sleep both on land and in the water, I think I have only ever seen Harbour Seals sleeping on land, or really rocks like this one. Besides sleeping, going on land allows them to warm up quicker by getting dry and having the sun heat both themselves and the rocks that they go on. But going on land is hard on these seals because since they can’t walk, they have to drag themselves and hop around, which often leads to getting scuffs and cuts.

 

This image is copyright © Terri Shaddick, if you are interested in using or purchasing this image, or any other images on my site, contact Terri Shaddick at contact@wildelements.ca.

 

Taken: August 13, 2016
Location: Johnstone Strait, British Columbia

Camera Specs

Camera: Canon EOS 1D X
Lens: Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM + 1.4x III Extender
Focal Length: 700mm
Aperture: f/13
ISO: 800
Exposure: 1/2000