My 2018 Photo Tour season is about to begin.

 

Coastal

We are starting 2018 off with a new, more exploratory (for us anyway), trip of the Southern part of the Great Bear Rainforest.  This trip is new to me, as not only will we be visiting a different part of the Great Bear Rainforest, but also visiting during a different time of year, the Spring…and surprisingly it’s not even raining so far.

 

While this part of the Great Bear Rainforest we will be less likely to see Spirit Bears, we may have the opportunity to photograph Sea Otters, and other marine life, along with Grizzly Bears.  And if we are super lucky maybe even a Coastal Wolf, like the one pictured here that was photographed in the Northern part of the Great Bear Rainforest (the Khutzeymateen) last spring.   But you never know what you are going to see until you see it, that is the beauty of nature, it’s beautiful and unpredictable.

 

There is still one spot available on the 2019 version of the trip if you are interested in joining us, visit my photo tours page.  Otherwise stay tuned for a post-trip update.

The question of “who needs mirrors” (i.e. mirrorless camera) is one I’m hoping that I can answer in the coming months (or at least form an opinion on).

 

I’m hoping to take possession of on my new Sony A7III next week, where I will spend the next couple months putting it to the test. I will be comparing it not only to itself, but also to the my Canon DSLRs as well.  And also hoping to borrow the flagship Sony A9 to do some more comparisons.

 

In the past I have shied away from Mirrorless Cameras because the electronic viewfinder made me feel seasick, and the reviews were just never that good that it made sense for me to own one (compared to my DSLRs).  But with Sony’s latest cameras and with rumours of Canon and Nikon coming out with their own full-frame mirrorless cameras, it seems like the have taken a bit of a leap.   While trying them in the store the Electronic Viewfinder seemed to be way less nauseating than before, and the AF was really quite something.

 

I’m excited to try out my new camera when it gets here, and start reporting on my results.  I’m going into it will a completely open mind, and maybe my mind just might be blown.

 

Stay tuned to my blog for my thoughts as I put the camera to the test, and also feel free to contact me if you have any specific questions that you would like answered.

Death Grip

 

Due to a cancellation, there is now one spot available on the 2018 Into the Great Bear Rainforest trip.  More information is available on my photo tours page.

 

There are also two spots available on the 2019 trip as well, more information is available here.

 

As always, feel free to contact me for more information, contact@wildelements.ca.

 

PS – I promise we only serve fresh fish on the boat, unlike the one being carried by this Spirit Bear.

Loving Life

Our 2019 Photo Tours are now available for public consumption.  In 2019 we have some new and exciting trips focused on the coast of British Columbia.

 

All trips can be found on my Photo Tours page.

 

As you will notice a number of trips are already sold-out, this is the result of people who were on the “Priority Booking” list for these trips, and received the first right of refusal to sign-up for the trips.  If you would like to be added to the Priority Booking list for 2020, or if you would like to be placed on a cancellation list for an already sold-out trip, please contact me at seminars@wildelements.ca.

 

These spots probably won’t last long, so contact me at seminars@wildelements.ca if you are interested in getting more information or if you are interest in signing up.  Sign up now and you will be Loving Life like this Sea Otter.

Jumping for Joy

Update, this spot has now been sold, however there are still spaces available on the 2019 version of this trip.  More information can be found on my Photo Tours page.

 

Good news for anyone that is looking to explore and photograph the Johnstone Strait area of British Columbia, we have one spot available on the trip 2018 Marine Mammals Instructional trip from August 1 to 10, 2018.

 

Details can found on my photo tours page.

 

Or you can view more details in the trip brochure.

 

This Jumping for Joy Image was photographed during my 2016 trip.  If you would like more information, or would like to join me this summer, contact me at seminars@wildelements.ca.

Lightroom Classic CC

  • Performance Upgrades
  • Collection Updates
  • Filtering Upgrades (edited/unedited)
  • New Camera/Lens Support

Lightroom CC

  • Adding Copyright on import
  • Android upgrades
  • iOS upgrades
  • New Camera/Lens Support

This week Adobe released new versions of both Lightroom CC (version 1.2), and Lightroom Classic CC (version 7.2).

 

The biggest update for Lightroom Classic CC that has me excited is the boost to performance for computers that have 12GB or more of ram. The boost in performance is advertised to be both when importing and exporting photos as well as when switching between loupe view. I have noticed that images are seeming to import faster, and the building of embedded previews has also been faster.  I have also noticed an improvement in how fast images deleted when selecting a large number of photos at one time.  In terms of how much actual time savings it is I haven’t quantified because there are so many factors that can impact it, including the number of other processes being run on the computer.

 

The other features of the Lightroom Classic CC upgrade which have me less excited (because I probably won’t use them) is the ability to create collections from folders, or from the map view. They have also added new filtering functions, including filtering based on whether an image is edited/unedited. Since I don’t do my editing in Lightroom, I don’t have a need for this filter, however I could see how it could be handy for those that do their editing in Lightroom, because you can see which images you still need to edit, or find one that you have edited more quickly.

 

More on the updates on Lightroom Classic CC can be found on the Adobe’s website here.

I am encouraged to see that Adobe is continuing to provide upgrades, especially performance upgrades, to it’s classic version.  I know they said they were going to continue to support and upgrade it, so I am happy to see that they are executing on the promise.

 

The changes to Lightroom CC are less exciting, with most of the changes coming to the mobile versions for Android and a few for iPad.  The upgrades for computer version is the ability to add copyright information when importing, and also they fixed a number of customer issues.  A number of improvements were made to android version, and you can see them all on Adobe’s website here.

 

Both version added support for new cameras.

 

If you have any questions on the latest updates, or my experience with them, feel free to contact me contact@wildelements.ca.

Breathtaking Breach

Are you looking to capture stunning images like the one in this post? Are you looking for a great photography adventure in 2019?

 

We are currently working our way through the priority booking list for all those that requested “first right of refusal”, and once that is complete we will be posting the trips online, hopefully in early February.

 

For those of you who are not aware, we allow clients to sign up to our priority booking list, more details can be found in the Priority Booking section of the Photo Tours page.

 

Once 2019 is available, we will begin to take names for our photo tours in 2020.

 

To see many of the great images that I was fortunate enough to capture on our trips over the years, visit my Journeys gallery.  Feel free to contact me for more information on any of our photo tours contact@wildelements.ca.

Breathtaking Breach

Are you looking to capture stunning images like the one in this post? Are you looking for a great photography adventure in 2019?

 

We are currently working our way through the priority booking list for all those that requested “first right of refusal”, and once that is complete we will be posting the trips online, hopefully in early February.

 

For those of you who are not aware, we allow clients to sign up to our priority booking list, more details can be found in the Priority Booking section of the Photo Tours page.

 

Once 2019 is available, we will begin to take names for our photo tours in 2020.

 

To see many of the great images that I was fortunate enough to capture on our trips over the years, visit my Journeys gallery.  Feel free to contact me for more information on any of our photo tours contact@wildelements.ca.

Good news for those that are looking for a late November trip, we have added a new trip to the roster for 2018 the “Kluane-Haines Explorer”, and there are spaces available.

 

View from Above

This trip starts off in Whitehorse in Canada’s North, and splits time between exploring Kluane National Park, and photographing the Dall Sheep that traverse the mountainside in this breathtaking environment.  This is followed by visiting Haines, Alaska, where you will spend several days along the river that is still open, and photographing the thousands of Bald Eagles that migrate to these open waters.

 

More information about this trip is available on my Photo Tours page or contact me contact@wildelements.ca for more information.

 

We are in the process of finalizing all the details of 2019 trips, and will be contacting those on the priority booking list soon about securing your spot.

Good news for those that are looking for a late November trip, we have added a new trip to the roster for 2018 the “Kluane-Haines Explorer”, and there are spaces available.

 

View from Above

This trip starts off in Whitehorse in Canada’s North, and splits time between exploring Kluane National Park, and photographing the Dall Sheep that traverse the mountainside in this breathtaking environment.  This is followed by visiting Haines, Alaska, where you will spend several days along the river that is still open, and photographing the thousands of Bald Eagles that migrate to these open waters.

 

More information about this trip is available on my Photo Tours page or contact me contact@wildelements.ca for more information.

 

We are in the process of finalizing all the details of 2019 trips, and will be contacting those on the priority booking list soon about securing your spot.

With 2017 coming to an end it gives me the chance to review my photos and reflect on some of the unique opportunities and images that I was able to enjoy in 2017.

 

Rock Climber

My year started off with a trip to the Yukon to check out Dall Sheep that are native to the Northwestern Part of North America, and therefore not something that I have the opportunity to photograph on a regular basis.  While I only had time to spend two days traversing the mountain range, I actually was able to come away with a few great photos of these unique creatures.

 

I had the opportunity to capture both close-up photos of the Dall Sheep and also some animalscape images taking in the beautiful mountain ranges that we were surrounded by.  My favourite image of the trip Rock Climber, was a lucky shot as I happened to turn around in time to see this Dall Sheep approaching us from behind, and it stopped right on the edge of the rocks, perfectly posed with the mountains behind him.

 

I also had a few other favourite images from the trip, the other images from this trip can be viewed in my Mammals Gallery.

 

I followed my trip to the Yukon with my Khutzeymateen trip in June 2017.  For those that don’t know, the Khutzeymateen is a Grizzly Bear Sanctuary located off

Coastal

the Northern Coast of British Columbia.  It is closed to public visitors, making the images that one captures on this trip very unique.  Of course the main draw to the Khutzeymateen is Grizzly Bears, and they were out in large numbers during our 2017 trips, where we saw somewhere in excess of 20 different Grizzly Bears on both the 4 and 3 day trips that I was on.  We were also lucky to spend time on both trips with a Coastal Grey Wolf.

 

In addition to the Grizzly Bears, I also had a couple of firsts in the Khutzeymateen, including seeing a couple of Black Bears, which is unique as the large number of of Grizzly Bears usually keeps the Black Bears away.  We also saw my first-ever Mink, which were roaming the shoreline, and we also saw a porcupine. So while the main draw is the Grizzly Bears, this remote location can be full of surprises, and this year was sure a lot of fun.

 

 

Leap of Faith

I have many favourite images from the Khutzeymateen this year, so I couldn’t keep it to just one.  My favourite Coastal Wolf shot is one I titled “Coastal”.  It just really depicts what a Coastal Wolf along a really stereotypical coastal background. I really liked the color of this wolf, with it having a lot more white than some of the other wolves I have seen along the BC Coast.   We didn’t walk away with any shortage of shots after this trip.

 

I have many Grizzly Bear images from the Khutzeymateen that I am happy with, including a number of images with mothers and cubs, or just the cubs.  But I think my favourite of the trip is probably Leap of Faith, mostly because it is just such a unique shot, and one that none of us expected.  Watching this Grizzly Bear as it approached the little channel of water is that he would go into it and walk through it.  Much to our surprise, he decided to make a Leap of Faith and jump and clear the water.

 

More images from my trips to the Khutzeymateen can been found in my Khutzeymateen Gallery and if you are interested in joining us on a trip in the future, visit my Photo Tours page.

 

In the summer I visited Northern BC where we had to take a helicopter into a remote camp in order to photograph Grizzly Bears feasting on salmon in the rivers.

Look What I Caught

This year we were really lucky to get the opportunity to photograph many different Grizzly Bears catching live fish, as

Ready to Pounce

opposed to just picking up carcasses along the edge of the river.  My favourite images from this trip were of the same bear, one image where he is ready to pounce at the fish titled “Ready to Pounce”, and the other is him showing off the fish he caught titled “Look What I Caught”. We watched this Grizzly Bear everyday that we were there, and he would entertain us for hours with his fishing, splashing around, and very slowing devouring every part of the fish.

In the fall I visited the Great Bear Rainforest for the fourth year, and as always, we had the opportunity to photograph a

diverse array of wildlife that calls the Great Bear Rainforest home, including Grizzly Bears, Black Bears, Spirit Bears,

Humpback Whales and even Killer Whales. While I’m still working my way through the images from the trip, one of my favourite so far is Under Cover, because not only does it have one of the rarest animals in Canada, but also because of how

Under Cover

she peeked out from under the dense cover of the Great Bear Rainforest at us.

 

To see other images that I have taken visit my Great Bear Rainforest photo gallery.  If you are interested in joining us on a future trip, find out more on my Photo Tours page.

 

In 2017 I had the opportunity to capture many great images, and I am looking forward to what 2018 has to offer.  Also with the start of 2018, we will be soon releasing our tour dates for 2019, contact me if you are interested in more information contact@wildelements.ca.

Lightroom Classic

 

Upgrades:

  • Ability to import Embedded Previews
  • Faster load time for application
  • Faster to move into Develop module
  • Faster navigating in Develop module

Lightroom CC

 

Upgrades:

  • Cloud Storage
  • Ability to access & edit images anywhere
  • Access images on any device or computer
  • Smart filtering of images

A few weeks ago Adobe released the new “Adobe Lightroom CC”, which is a completely redesigned a new Lightroom program.  They also announced that the “old” version of Lightroom received an upgrade, and would now be known as “Adobe Lightroom Classic”.  In the blog post I will discuss some of the overall changes to two Lightroom versions, as well as specifically addressing the Library Module.  In a future post I will look more carefully at the Develop (or “Edit” in CC) Module.

 

Adobe Lightroom Classic

 

Adobe Lightroom Classic is the version that current users were used to, and the look and feel of the program remained pretty much the same.  Adobe has boasted that it has worked to improve the speed of the program. One of the most noticeable upgrades to Classic is that they now allow for importing “embedded previews”.  Importing embedded previews means that it uses the previews that the camera uses, and already exists with the RAW file, so it allows you to view the images at 1:1 was faster than before.  Instead of building 1:1 previews, and having it be an incredible resource hog on your computer, you now have the ability to use the embedded previews on import and start looking at the 1:1 almost right away.

 

I have re-imported some of my recent Great Bear Rainforest images, and selected the import with Embedded Previews and so far this has seemed to speed up the culling and reviewing process by quite a bit.  Because I only really use Lightroom for image management, including culling (as opposed to editing), this feature is really valuable for me, as would any upgrade that speeds up looking at images 1:1, and getting through them as quickly as possible.  The only problem with this new feature is that there is no way to add embedded previews after the fact, the only way to do so is to actually re-import the images and select “Embedded & Sidecars” in the Build Previews section of the File Handling.  But so far I have found this to be a very good addition to the new Classic version of Lightroom, and find myself going back to older galleries and re-importing the images, because it’s actually that much faster.

 

Adobe Lightroom CC

 

The new Lightroom CC is a whole other beast.  While the look and feel has some similarities, there are also many differences to the program, and I haven’t fully immersed myself into the new program. The first thing that you will notice is that it is a cloud based program. The advantage to this is that you can access and edit your photos from anywhere.  The downside, and what will keep me from moving over to the program, is that you are limited to your amount of cloud storage.

 

The basic photography package that I am signed up for only includes 20GB, and with the number of photos I take, and with high-resolution cameras like the 5D Mark IV, you can very quickly use up the 20GB. I still find cloud storage, for the amount that I would require, to be quite pricey, and I would rather pay for my storage up-front, and know that I can access any files I save to it (as opposed to being at the mercy to continue to pay for the storage).

 

I recently upgraded my home storage to a RAID & NAS system that allows me to access files remotely if I want to.  The unfortunate part is that I cannot use this in conjunction with the new Lightroom CC.  All files and folders must be stored locally, or on a hard drive attached directly to the computer, not a network.  The Classic Lightroom allows for you to to store and access the files from the network drive, therefore leaving lots of room on your computer hard drive, and allows me to access my files over the network.

 

The new Lightroom CC also goes from the classic catalogue image organization to “album” based image organization. To me this just increases the risk of misplacing files, especially if you aren’t overly organized in file storage.  Why not just have the files and folders mimic how they are organized in the Finder, but I guess since they are stored in cloud, you will access them directly there.

 

When you are in the “My Photos” section, which is similar to the “Library” module of the Lightroom Classic, while the layout has changed slightly, you will find most of the same things in there as in the Classic. However, when reviewing and culling images I often use the color flagging, which is not available in the new Lightroom CC, so if I were to covert, I would need to find another way to flag various images.

 

A powerful feature that I use often in Lightroom is filtering, whether to check out high ISO shots for comparison, or by camera type, however I cannot find the same ability to filter in the new Lightroom CC. Again, this may be a future upgrade, but it’s another feature that would keep me from fully converting. However, Lightroom CC does have a unique search feature which allows you to search images without having keyword.  For example if you type “mountain” in the search bar, it will return images of mountains.  Well I tried it, and while it did return images of mountains, it did also return images that had nothing to do with mountains, Adobe has said that it will continue to refine this feature.

 

Will I be Making the Switch?

 

While there are great additions to Lightroom CC, and if I was a new Lightroom user (and not already stuck in my ways) it’s a pretty great program. However for me, cloud-based storage isn’t a way I want to go at this time.  And I still find Lightroom Classic to be more powerful for what I use Lightroom for, image management and culling.

 

I am looking forward to continuing to work with both programs in the future to look more closely at the differences, especially in the edit module. If you have questions, feel free to contact me contact@wildelements.ca.