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Popular Perch

Popular perch was actually a pretty common scene while we were photographing Bald Eagles in Alaska. I was surprised to see that often there were popular perches, and one in particular we saw a Bald Eagle on everyday we were there. I was even more surprised to see them sharing a perch, especially when they were this close to one another. But then there would be other times that an eagle would be on a perch and if another eagle showed up it would fly away – it makes you wonder if it was that just an anti-social eagle, or are there other dominance type factors at play here.

 

For example, are these eagles mates, or family members, and therefore more likely to share than say two male eagles that have no genetics in common. Without banding and tracking each eagle over several years it would be hard to know for sure whether it’s only certain ones that are willing to share, and whether that sharing is extended to everyone or just family (or mates).

 

If you are interested in purchasing this image, or any other images on my site, please contact me contact@wildelements.ca.

 

Taken: November 23, 2016
Location: Alaska

Camera: Canon EOS-1D X Mark II
Lens: Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM + 1.4x III Extender
Focal Length: 700mm
Aperture: f/8
ISO: 1250
Exposure: 1/500

About this Image

Popular perch was actually a pretty common scene while we were photographing Bald Eagles in Alaska. I was surprised to see that often there were popular perches, and one in particular we saw a Bald Eagle on everyday we were there. I was even more surprised to see them sharing a perch, especially when they were this close to one another. But then there would be other times that an eagle would be on a perch and if another eagle showed up it would fly away – it makes you wonder if it was that just an anti-social eagle, or are there other dominance type factors at play here.

 

For example, are these eagles mates, or family members, and therefore more likely to share than say two male eagles that have no genetics in common. Without banding and tracking each eagle over several years it would be hard to know for sure whether it’s only certain ones that are willing to share, and whether that sharing is extended to everyone or just family (or mates).

 

If you are interested in purchasing this image, or any other images on my site, please contact me contact@wildelements.ca.
Taken: November 23, 2016
Location: Alaska

Camera Specs

Camera: Canon EOS-1D X Mark II
Lens: Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM + 1.4x III Extender
Focal Length: 700mm
Aperture: f/8
ISO: 1250
Exposure: 1/500